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Cooking and fumes

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d*l*b

Rising Star
A couple of questions about A/B:
  • Vinegar stinks. Is it unsuitable for use in busy areas? Does cooking with citric acid smell less?
  • How much citric acid should be added per litre of water to acidify adequately?
 
d*l*b said:
A couple of questions about A/B:
  • Vinegar stinks. Is it unsuitable for use in busy areas? Does cooking with citric acid smell less?
  • How much citric acid should be added per litre of water to acidify adequately?
Vinegar does stink, because it is volatile and is boiled off of the decoction. Same applies with hydrochloric acid. The good thing at least with vinegary smell is that it is not "suspicious"; you may be doing a regular cooking routine and you just love to cook with loads of vinegar. Citric acid on the other hand is not volatile, cannot be easily be boiled off the solution and thus and it doesn't smell on its own.

A tablespoon per litre should be more than enough. SWIM has been using just a pinch per 2 litres with good results.

Hope that helps!
 
Ascorbic acid (vitamin c) is even better and smells a lot less pungent than vinegar. Regardless, the boil is going to be the least obnoxious smelling part of the process. Solvent pulls and evaporation tend to get downright estinky.

If smell is an issue, avoid xylene. Estinky in the extreme.
 
Uncle Knucles said:
Ascorbic acid (vitamin c) is even better and smells a lot less pungent than vinegar. Regardless, the boil is going to be the least obnoxious smelling part of the process. Solvent pulls and evaporation tend to get downright estinky.

If smell is an issue, avoid xylene. Estinky in the extreme.
Not only is it stinky. It's extremely unhealthy stuff to breathe in.

There is a thread considering the long-term health effects of DMT use. Someone expressed a concern for the possible carcinogenic effects of DMT, since terrence mckenna died of a brain tumor.

I do not think that DMT is carcinogenic. If there is anything that would have been the cause of his tumor, i think it must be doing extractions on a frequent base.

Most solvents are extremely carcinogenic. And they are neurotoxic as well. People who work with solvents like thinner (toluene) on a frequent basis, very often devellop a syndrome of wich i don't know the name exactly (hope it's not a sign of that very syndrome) but it makes you look, walk and talk like you're permanently drunk.
 
if you're going for a freeze precipitation move all the food out of the freezer. SWIM's ice cream tasted like naptha.

Vinegar doesn't smell too much, but with the cooking time being 4-10 hours it does it bothersome, but nothing candles and incense haven't covered.

THP smells much less than a cook, but the water amounts are redic

If you are in a "busy" area you shouldn't extract IMO. its too risky.
 
Just to add to this after a few goes working with both citric and vinegar. There is no noticeable difference in smell between the two, working with 1tbsp vinegar/1L water. The only strong smell is the bark itself.
 
alicedee25 said:
if you're going for a freeze precipitation move all the food out of the freezer. SWIM's ice cream tasted like naptha.

Swim always wraps her precipitation beaker with food wrap film and never had this problem.

alicedee25 said:
If you are in a "busy" area you shouldn't extract IMO. its too risky.

Semi-closed extractors (Soxhlet, etc) produce almost no fumes.
 
d*l*b said:
A couple of questions about A/B:
  • Vinegar stinks. Is it unsuitable for use in busy areas? Does cooking with citric acid smell less?
  • How much citric acid should be added per litre of water to acidify adequately?

Try phosphoric acid. It does not smell at all because it doesn't boil off.

It is a strong acid, so you would need very little of it to reach the required pH.

It is available "food grade".
 
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