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Ideas on using pectin enzyme on tea?

modern

Esteemed member
So I have a hard time following cielo as is and always end up with goo. I may reattempt once more simply adding 2-3x salt brine washes which seem to dry my ethyl acetate. I attempted sodium carbonate drying but it didn't work.

So I've had success with making a tea, reducing to 100-200ml and pulling from that. HOWEVER I get emulsion like CRAZY which adds a lot of extra time and processing to break it.

Reading old posts someone mentioned that pectin is likely the reason for emulsions so I was wondering if someone has a good understanding of this and if pectin enzyme might fix this issue?

I may try it myself in the future but would like some insight
 
I tried pectinase on reduced cactus tea a while back. You have to get it to the right pH and temperature for it to work. It did cut the viscosity of the tea somewhat and I did not get an emulsion on that batch when I extracted. I only tried it the once , and it was several years ago so I don't remember the details, but it did seem to lessen the mucilage noticeably.
 
Thanks... I researched more after you shared more on the enzyme. I'm not sure if it's worth the trouble since temp and pH wouldn't be easy for me to control.

I've noticed that after 2-3 salt brine washes most of the mucilage is reduced but before salting I do filter thru a cotton pad which seems to perfectly separate the solvent from the mucus. A small batch I'm working on became almost a gel after allowing emulsion to break overnight. Salt brine helped the viscosity and now filtering.

I got salt without goo which still hasn't happened with regular cielo. I'll need to reattempt again using salt brine washes to hopefully prevent mucilage issue and also prevent goo.
 
Hey Modern Im pretty interested in this area also. In my mind if we can break down these complex molecules into fermentable sugars and throw some bacteria and yeast at it then we could make the tea drinking experience way more enjoyable (well maybe enjoyable is going a bit far but it could be improved I have no doubt). This could also mean that tea could be stored and aged if PH and alcohol content were suitable. A lot of times disagreeable compounds turn into something marvellous with age. Butyric acid springs to mind, it is often formed during wild fermentations and smells like vomit however give it time and it combines with ethanol to form ethyl butyrate which smells like cherries. I have some imaginary hope that complex acidity, alcohol and esterification could make cactus tea into something agreeable.

I also think that if most of the fermentables can be used up then making resin would be easier as there would be less caramelised material at the end.
 
Hey Modern Im pretty interested in this area also. In my mind if we can break down these complex molecules into fermentable sugars and throw some bacteria and yeast at it then we could make the tea drinking experience way more enjoyable (well maybe enjoyable is going a bit far but it could be improved I have no doubt). This could also mean that tea could be stored and aged if PH and alcohol content were suitable. A lot of times disagreeable compounds turn into something marvellous with age. Butyric acid springs to mind, it is often formed during wild fermentations and smells like vomit however give it time and it combines with ethanol to form ethyl butyrate which smells like cherries. I have some imaginary hope that complex acidity, alcohol and esterification could make cactus tea into something agreeable.

I also think that if most of the fermentables can be used up then making resin would be easier as there would be less caramelised material at the end.
I'm really looking forward to the day when someone reports back on a successful cactus fermentation. My own experience is limited to an 18-month-old aged-on-the-sludge cactus tea that was fortified with neutral grain alcohol. It was surprisingly palatable, and it seemed like some sugars possibly had developed from the pectin.
 
Some relevant content to cross-link from the harmala section:
 
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