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Botany The Acacia Grow Thread

Growing logs with advice and results.
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Thank you! Yeah no customs issues.. was a 5 min drive up the road 😎

And it’s my pleasure, if you have any more questions don’t hesitate to ask! Look forward to seeing your progress. Will you test it for alkaloids one day? It’s a very promising species retinodes..
I actually have some material from the parent tree so it may end up getting run through some kind of analysis, especially in light of the current method development I've been working on. It will be nice to see how it compares with that of its offspring, since the growing conditions are going to be rather different.
 
Ok cool.. you shouldn’t have any problems growing narrow phyllode in your area.. during the seedling stage I would keep them in a greenhouse for winter if possible. Next winter they should be established enough. Do you get heavy frosts?

Hardening my plants before the first frost hits. Moving into my own home finally so will be putting some in the ground. I’m aware winter isn’t the best time to put plants in the ground, however, since I have so many plants it will at the very least let me know if it was the right move or not. I won’t put any in the ground that I haven’t grown a lot of.

Below some shots of their final days before finding a new home. Also a couple shots of a few NP acuminata which are 6 months old and some Acacia granitica which are a bit over a year old. Acuminata definitely are slower growers than most of my other plants. Once in the ground they should really take off though.
It's considered a cold snap when we hit -4 to -5 the worst I've seen in my life time is -8. Most frosts here are -1 to -3 and are gone by 8/9 am winter temp day avg is 15°C

I plan on planting them in the ground in September /
 
@acacian - thanks for the grow tips you posted a few days back! I had a little peek at my seeds today and saw that at least two of them have sprouted! <3
I got 20 out of 24 to swell up with the sandpaper technique, so I'm pretty stoked about this. I also did a little experimentation and found that between 5 and 8 gentle scrapes with 120 grit emery paper on both of the long edges and the far tip (away from the hilum) made for the most successful chances of rapid rehydration.

Time to get that gritty compost mixed, and I hope to be able to contribute a few nice pics over the coming weeks.
 
Hopefully this round of pictures is easier to see than the last lot. There is a very distinct difference between the acuminata and the floribunda now.

Still have the two that just popped from the native soil in with an acuminata, I'll be looking at up potting them soon as I started seeing root tips a week or two ago. When I up put them I'll see if I can save the two that came along for the ride.
 

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BTW, it was very clear from the swelling of the seeds alone that they were ready to be placed in dark germination conditions - the lightening of the seed coat was noticeable only upon close inspection in the case of these probable retinodes seeds.

One of the other zillion things I ought to be getting on with is characterising the phyllode biochemistry - I do rather wish I'd stripped the branch and twig bark at the time of pruning as well but that was, sadly, impractical at the time.
 
@Transform yeah different seeds will behave differently.. not all have such an obvious colour change. Hope they germ!

That would be really cool to see more info on.. I suspect it will lead to also understanding common chemical profiles in alkaloid bearing species.. and even their correlation to different taxonomic traits.
 
Hopefully this round of pictures is easier to see than the last lot. There is a very distinct difference between the acuminata and the floribunda now.

Still have the two that just popped from the native soil in with an acuminata, I'll be looking at up potting them soon as I started seeing root tips a week or two ago. When I up put them I'll see if I can save the two that came along for the ride.
Yeah your acuminata are getting the more terete shape to the phyllodes. They’ll continue on that trajectory for a little while and then will flatten out again as it gets older!

Also.. don’t worry too much about seeing tips of roots at the bottom.. the tap root is first to get down there and will often give you the impression that it needs to be repotted earlier than it does. Obviously having it in bigger pots will help anyways, however transplanting when too young means the roots won’t have bound with the soil yet and you can run the risk of damaging them when transplanting.. they don’t look at all at the point of needing to be transplanted IMO.. even 2 weeks after sprouting a seed can have a tap root almost 3 inches long..

The amount of times I’ve seen roots sticking out the bottom and transplanted only to find the roots are barely developed outwards..
 
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@Transform yeah different seeds will behave differently.. not all have such an obvious colour change. Hope they germ!

That would be really cool to see more info on.. I suspect it will lead to also understanding common chemical profiles in alkaloid bearing species.. and even their correlation to different taxonomic traits.
Had another little peep today and most of the 20 successfully soaked seeds start showing signs of sprouting. Because of an unexpected meeting, preparing the grit and perlite got postponed again, but there will be some photos coming up very soon! 🤩
 
Had another little peep today and most of the 20 successfully soaked seeds start showing signs of sprouting. Because of an unexpected meeting, preparing the grit and perlite got postponed again, but there will be some photos coming up very soon! 🤩
As promised:
CIMG0901.jpg
That's about a dozen out of twenty so I'll be hoping that a few more sprout when the weather warms back up.
 
Awesome @Transform !

I’m sure your aware of this, but you’ll want to get those ones with the longer taproots in pretty soon.. or at least a great deal of care will need to be taken orienting them down in the mix without snapping them when you do. Looking good though.
 
Awesome @Transform !

I’m sure your aware of this, but you’ll want to get those ones with the longer taproots in pretty soon.. or at least a great deal of care will need to be taken orienting them down in the mix without snapping them. Looking good though.
Thanks for the nudge - I'll get down to it ASAP. Fortunately, I'm pretty good with handling fragile plants as well, but that's no excuse for further dawdling! Also, temperatures have tailed off a bit the last couple of nights, maybe that'll keep things from progressing too quickly?

Any ideas about the slow germinators? Normal variation/levels of inviability?
 
Thanks for the nudge - I'll get down to it ASAP. Fortunately, I'm pretty good with handling fragile plants as well, but that's no excuse for further dawdling! Also, temperatures have tailed off a bit the last couple of nights, maybe that'll keep things from progressing too quickly?

Any ideas about the slow germinators? Normal variation/levels of inviability?
Cool temp will maybe slow things, but I'm hearing permission to dawdle further so can't sign off on that one! And I think once they sprout they'll move pretty quickly. Anyways.. if dawdle is a must.. make sure you don't let the tap roots dry out and maybe swap for fresh damp paper towel so they don't go mouldy. A chop stick is a good tool for poking deep holes for long tails.. that sounded poetic 😅
 
Cool temp will maybe slow things, but I'm hearing permission to dawdle further so can't sign off on that one! And I think once they sprout they'll move pretty quickly. Anyways.. if dawdle is a must.. make sure you don't let the tap roots dry out and maybe swap for fresh damp paper towel so they don't go mouldy. A chop stick is a good tool for poking deep holes for long tails.. that sounded poetic 😅
I've cunningly set things up using very clean water from the start, plus a piece of felt as a filter to allow a tiny bit of FAE without drying out to much. But, I promise you, I will be getting on with it. This one now has top priority!
 
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